Sudhir Choudhrie’s Passion To Save Lives

Sudhir Choudhrie, the award-winning entrepreneur, got a miraculous heart transplant that gave him another chance to live in 2000. He was diagnosed with a severe condition that made his heart skip beats resulting from a leaking valve at eight years old. When he was 50 years old, Sudhir Choudhrie’s heart started giving out, and he was given a few hours to die if the heart transplant wasn’t done. Choudhrie found a new heart at the 11th hour when a 20-year-old with a matching heart died in a motorbike accident.

Sudhir Choudhrie currently dedicates most of his time to charitable efforts. The University of Oxford AND Green Templeton College are among the most significant philanthropic endeavors, where the libraries presently bear the family name. Choudhrie is also actively involved in the medical realm as a philanthropist accompanied by many charities in health and education across the United States, India, and the United Kingdom. Rt Hon Theresa May MP awarded Sudhir Choudhrie the Asian Business Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. Sudhir Choudhrie’s heart transplant made his family discover that he had the titin gene mutation mostly linked to heart failure. The gene mutation doesn’t always guarantee that your heart will fail, but it substantially increases the risk. It is believed his brother also had the mutation, which eventually caused his untimely death and more

Sudhir’s book, From My Heart: A Tale of Life, Love, and Destiny, based on his experience as a transplant patient, has become an Amazon bestseller. His daily mantra is that a transplant isn’t a death sentence and Changing to a healthy diet and lifestyle gives a new lease on life!

He established the Sudhir Choudhrie Professorship of Cardiology at the Columbia University Medical Center in 2009 due to the care he received. He also set up the Choudhrie Family Foundation in 2010 to sponsor medicinal, health, and educational projects globally. The Choudhrie Family Foundation also backs the #OrgansWill campaign in the US, saving 500,000 lives.

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